UpriseUp - Up
UpriseUp - Rise
UpriseUp - Up
Back to EventsBack to Blog

SEO Updates for April and May 2022

April started spectacularly with Brighton SEO bringing together SEO enthusiasts from across the globe. We witnessed a great range of talks at the biannual beachside conference, covering everything from the fundamentals of search right through to the future of SEO in the ‘metaverse’. The weeks to follow have continued to offer several other interesting developments which we’re unpacking below. 

Google Released Annual Search Spam Report

In response to a world searching for ‘how to heal’, Google highlighted how they kept 99% of searches spam-free with significant improvements in fighting link spam, scam results, and ranking manipulation in their annual search spam report. 

Google also focussed on reducing low-quality content through identifying behaviours that manipulated search rankings. These behaviours would narrowly avoid violation of the quality guidelines but negatively impact user experience. With the help of their AI-based system SpamBrain, Google stated they were able to keep 99% of searches spam-free in 2021.

As ever, websites should follow best practice guidance and steer clear of ‘black hat’ SEO techniques, such as keyword stuffing and product review manipulation, to avoid being penalised by Google’s spam algorithms. Producing high-quality, relevant content for your customers will always be the best way to help improve your search rankings. 

Google Search Parameter Tool Officially Offline

Back in March, Google announced it was going to retire the URL parameters tool, and this is the first month we can see it coming into effect. Google has now turned off support for the tool in Google Search Console. The decision was made by Google to turn off the tool due to the advancement in Google’s capabilities to decipher which parameters are useful on a site. With only a minute number of parameter configurations specified in the parameter tool deemed useful for crawling purposes, the tool was deemed unnecessary. 

Google has stated that ‘Google’s crawlers will learn how to deal with URL parameters automatically’ in the near future. We would suggest making a note of this update on your reports and keeping an eye on your analytics over the coming weeks just in case any issues arise from this change. 

 

Significant Changes to Featured Snippets being Tested

Google has started some testing that may provide a major shake-up of the featured snippets section on SERPs. Our SEO Team certainly has a lot to say about these two new features:

‘From the Web’: Traditionally, the featured snippet shown at the top is a table, a list, or a snippet of text with a link to the webpage the content comes from. For text snippets, Google is now testing short excerpts from two to three other websites in the same section, with links to the sites added after the sites’ favicons. 

 

‘Other Sites Say’: Google is planning to group at least three different sites under a new ‘Other Sites Say’ section, which shares some resemblance with the established ‘People also ask’ section. Again, this will provide more exposure for brands, but equally will create more competition in the top-ranking results. 

  

What could this mean for search?

Sites that currently hold the featured snippet position for certain keywords could face a substantial loss of traffic as more competition enters position zero in SERPs. On the flip side, if you’re not currently featuring in any snippets, this update could increase your chances and improve traffic volume to your site. 

It will be very interesting to see the impact of these tests on clickthrough rate (CTR) and visibility in the search results, and whether these updates are rolled out temporarily or permanently. One to keep an eye on!

Google PaLM: The Future of Next Generation Search

This month Google revealed a breakthrough in its efforts to create an AI architecture that can handle millions of different tasks by itself. Enter PaLM.

What is PaLM?

Google’s Pathways Language Model research (PaLM) is an AI architecture Google has been developing. PaLM can produce answers reflective of fluctuating contexts by learning how to efficiently solve millions of different tasks, including complex learning and reasoning. 

What makes PaLM special?

PaLM is a system worth recognising as it’s striving to combine the efforts of multiple existing AI systems, into a singular architecture. To achieve this, recent developments of the PaLM system have involved the scaling of the few-shot learning (FSL) process. This is a type of machine learning method that works with a limited training dataset, as opposed to deep machine learning, where an extensive amount of data needs to be manually input for the AI to learn each new ability. Essentially, FSL has the AI learning so it can make predictions based on a smaller dataset.

Recently completed was the BIG-bench benchmark, where several tasks were designed to see how large language models, such as PaLM, responded. Of the 150 strong BIG-bench tasks (relating to reasoning, translation, and question answering), PaLM outperformed many of the current state-of-the-art models. There were many notable achievements on hundreds of language understanding and generation benchmarks, including: 

 

  • Enhanced reasoning abilities 
  • Explanation generation 
  • Inference Chaining

 

This recent research shows PaLM delivers significant improvements compared to current AI systems and can even ‘outperform human benchmarks’ for certain elements of language processing and reasoning. However, humans still outperformed the new algorithm on 35% of tasks. So, whilst breakthroughs are being made, PaLM is not quite there yet. 

What could this mean for search?

Machine learning has a big impact on how search results are created, tailoring results more and more to the needs of the user. As PaLM seeks to consolidate all this machine learning into one AI system, the change to search may not be great. However, with capabilities in one place, it may mean Google can get an even greater understanding of the intent and needs of users when they use search engines. Either way, this is an update to keep an eye on.

Did we miss any SEO news?

Think we may have missed something worth exploring or if you have some thoughts you’d like to share on SEO developments? We’d love to hear from you! 

Join the conversation and tweet us @upriseUPSEM, email us at [email protected], or simply send us a message through our contact page.

    Did you enjoy this blog post?

    Share this article:

    Back to EventsBack to Blog

    Noteworthy paid media developments in April and May 2022

    Staying on top of new digital tools, the latest channel updates, and user demands can be overwhelming, we know. Which is why we’ve assessed the latest paid media developments during April and May and put our heads together to evaluate what this means for the paid media landscape. 

    Have your pad and pen ready (definitely worth taking note of), below our team of digital media specialists, share what the latest developments are and what this means for digital marketers. 

     

    New Custom Columns in Google Ads
    Google recently announced some major updates to custom columns in Google Ads. The biggest change is the inclusion of functions. These operate much like functions in spreadsheets such as excel, and allow for a whole host of new uses for custom columns not possible before.

    Alongside this change, Google has also added the ability to reference custom columns within formulas, allowing for custom columns to work off of each other. This is useful with the new options functions have unlocked. We are also now able to pull text elements like campaign or ad group name into the columns. 

    These changes are very welcome, custom columns have until recently been mostly used to segment-specific conversions into a column for optimisation purposes. The options available for calculation within the columns were just not complete enough to allow for many more use cases. With these changes, however, there are many more situations where custom columns could be useful in optimising an account.

    Reference: https://support.google.com/google-ads/answer/12041700?hl=en  

    Dan Biggs, Paid Media Consultant 

     

    New Cookie Choices for Google in Europe

    Google announced last month that they’ll be rolling out new cookie banners in Europe to anyone visiting Search or YouTube while signed out or in Incognito Mode. The update will give these users the additional option to ‘Reject All’ cookies:

     

    The update began with a roll out across France and will soon be introduced across the rest of the European Economic Area. 

    This is a big change for Google, moving away from a design made to make it difficult for users to opt out of cookies. With a continued commitment to “building privacy-preserving tools”, Google believes they can protect people’s private data while also giving businesses the tools they need to thrive in their digital environment. One thing’s for certain, it will be interesting to find out how this is all going to work.

    Matt Hekkink, Paid Media Analyst 

     

    Upgrades to Google Ads Extensions 

    Starting this month, Google made some significant adjustments to ad extensions and upgraded all extension types (excluding image and location extensions).

    So, what’s the difference? Well, it means there’s now a distinction between “extensions (upgraded)” and “extensions” for the new and existing extensions, making it clear which extensions are legacy and which will have the new features, allowing you to retain your historic data.

    The new features include some very beneficial changes such as the ability to pause extensions, rather than outright removing them, and a “trickle-down” system for the different hierarchies of extensions.

    This means that where previously higher-level extensions were limited by existing extensions at an ad group or campaign level, with the upgraded extensions all extensions can serve despite existing ones. For example, an Ad Group with existing sitelinks can now pull sitelinks from the Campaign or Account levels where they were previously restricted to just the Ad Group level extensions.

     

    These features are definitely a big improvement but it’ll definitely be worth checking that your high-level extensions match with all of your ads just to be safe.

    Ross Stratford, Paid Media Assistant

     

    Updates to Google’s 3 strike system 

    A new three strike disapproval rule is being implemented for google ads in June 2022 after being trialled in September 2021. The strike system will be for the following policies in particular: Enabling dishonest behaviour, Unapproved substances, Guns, gun parts and related products, Explosives, Other Weapons and Tobacco. A ‘strike’ will be added to your account if a policy is repeatedly broken. 

    First Disapproval

    The first stage will just be a warning and will result in a normal ad disapproval. Google wants to be fair and make sure that everyone is aware of the policy rules before they start blocking accounts. 

    Strike One

    The first strike will come if google deems policy to have been broken again within 90 days of the first warning disapproval, in this case there will be a full account block for three days in which no ads will be able to run. After three days the account will be enabled again but the offending ads will remain disapproved until they comply with policy.

    Strike Two

    The second strike is much like strike one but the whole account will be blocked for seven days, rather than three,  if google deems policy to have been broken again within 90 days of strike one.

    Strike Three

    The third strike is another violation within 90 days of strike two. This will result in the full suspension of your account and google doesn’t specify if there is any timeframe in which you will be allowed access to the account again.

    You may appeal strikes but your ads won’t be able to show until either the block has been lifted and the appeal accepted or the temporary block time is over, you have fixed all policy violations in the account and completed an acknowledgement form. 

    Whilst this may not affect many accounts it’s worth considering the reasons disapprovals may occur, we often have surprising disapprovals due to some content linked to the landing page we are promoting rather than the ads themselves, as there is now more at stake we recommend everyone keeping their eyes out for disapprovals and brushing up on the policies!

    Reference: https://support.google.com/adspolicy/answer/10922738?hl=en-GB 

    Brogan Carroll, Paid Media Analyst

     

    Meta have updated their Facebook Ad’s Manager Objectives

    Meta have started rolling out changes to their Objectives in Ads Manager, or at least how their Objectives are named and grouped together. 

    Prior to the change, there were 3 broad categories of Awareness, Consideration and Conversions, with then 12 sub-category Objectives across these e.g. Reach, Traffic, Catalogue Sales etc. With the changes, Meta have now consolidated this to 6 core Objectives, which they say are “grouped together based on their expected business outcome”. It’s important to clarify that:

    • Objective names will change but you can still perform the same functions and access the features you’re familiar with.
    • Campaigns created before the update will remain with the previous Objectives, so there is no need to change these manually.  

    We think the most significant change to be aware of, is to how conversion-optimised campaigns are now set-up, as there are multiple ways to ultimately reach the same outcome. For example, you can optimise for website conversions under either of these 3 Objectives: Engagement, Leads, Sales, but will need to specify the correct ‘Conversion Location’ for each.  

     

    Engagement Objective: 

    Leads Objective:

     

    More details on the changes can be found here.

    Will Rhodes, Paid Media Manager 

     

      Did you enjoy this blog post?

      Share this article:

      Back to EventsBack to Blog

      How to successfully run responsive search ads (RSAs)

      Not long ago Google announced the end of an era for expanded text ads. As of June 30th 2022, you will no longer be able to create or edit expanded text ads. 

      The announcement surfaced last year and here at Uprise Up, we’ve been preparing our client’s accounts ever since. Introducing responsive search ads (RSAs) into each of our ad groups ahead of June 30th. To help you also get ahead and be fully prepared for the change, we’ve jotted down our top tips in this blog for running successful responsive search ads. 

      First things first, what are responsive search ads?

      Responsive search ads (RSAs) are another step in the direction towards automation from Google. Expanded text ads (ETAs) had a set of 3 headlines and 2 descriptions that are shown statically, whereas RSAs allow us to select up to 15 headlines and 4 descriptions. Google then automatically tests the different combinations of these headlines and descriptions to give the user the ‘best’ performing combinations. 

      Ok, so what are the potential benefits of RSAs?

      • Improved performance. According to Google, advertisers that add RSAs to their ad groups achieve up to 10% more clicks and conversions. From our experience, we’ve also seen RSAs often out-perform existing ETAs when added into our accounts. 
      • Increase ad relevance and reach. More headlines and descriptions mean Google can serve more relevant combinations to the user. With more keywords in your ad copy, you’ll be entered into more auctions for relevant searches. 
      • They’re a time saver. Instead of needing to set up multiple variations of ETAs to test and learn, you only need the one responsive search ad which will test the combinations automatically.

      One thing to note is that while Google’s auto suggestions can often be useful, they are equally often not so useful. We’d advise taking a cautious approach when applying these.

      So, on the flip side, what are the potential downsides to RSAs?

      • Less control. Your ability to specify how an ad is formatted and reads overall is limited, due to the nature of the machine learning testing various combinations. This may lead to headlines appearing together which don’t necessarily work well or make sense to a user, or for your brand.
      • Reduced learnings. You cannot see as easily which headlines and descriptions have the best CTR and conversion rate, and therefore might work well outside of Paid Search.
      • Can actually take more time to select headlines and descriptions that work well together, but are unique enough, while also assessing whether to make use of the pinning feature (discussed below) can actually be more time-consuming than creating a standard ETA.
      • Beware of auto-suggestions. Google will be missing important context, so not all suggestions will be relevant.

       

      How to Run Responsive Search Ads Successfully

      Top tip time:

      • Include keywords in your headlines. To reach those good and excellent ad strengths you’ll need to make sure you have headlines relevant to your keywords. You can also use dynamic keyword insertions to insert your keyword into headlines, from experience this will help to optimise your ad strength. 
      • Include unique headlines. To give Google the variation it needs to test and optimise your RSA, you’ll need to keep your headlines unique. Try using a variety of calls to action and offers to improve headline uniqueness. 
      • Have a combination of short and long headlines. ‘Long’ headlines being within the 30 character cap.
      • Use all the headline and description fields available. If you can aim to fill out all 15 headlines and 4 descriptions, at a minimum include 10 headlines. 
      • Pay attention to ‘ad strength’. Google will offer you suggestions to improve the ad strength of your RSAs. You’ll want to get the ad strength up to at least “Good” but ideally aiming for “Excellent”.

       

      To pin or not to pin, that is the question.

      Responsive search ads are far from perfect, we’ll still quite often see Google pair similar headlines together as the highest serving combination (e.g. two branded headlines rather than a branded headline and a CTA). There’s definitely still questions to be answered. 

      Our biggest one is around the pinning feature. When setting up your RSA, you have the option to pin a headline or description so that they only appear in a certain position. While this sounds great (especially for controlling brand messaging), the ad strength of the ad is very much affected by the use of pinning. A lower ad strength may impact your achievable impressions share and your CPC, and may result in lower impressions/clicks as a result.

      With that in mind, you may be wondering: 

      • What is the actual impact of a lower ad strength on the total impressions?
      • Does this impact outweigh the benefits of improved brand messaging?
      • How do we best use pins to balance this impact?

      Fortunately, we have sought-out to find the answers!

       

      What we’re testing

      We’ve set up an experiment to test the pinning feature specifically. We’re running A/B experiments to test RSAs with no pinning, fully pinned, and a balance of pinning. 

      Specifically one thing we’re testing, is how the number of pins effects ad strength. For example will pinning 4-5 headlines in a single headline position still allow for a stronger ad strength compared to 1-2? 

      We’ll also be testing the impact of losing an ‘excellent’ ad strength in favour of pinning, looking at the effects on impression share against conversions. 

       

      We’ll be running this test over the next few months and look forward to sharing the results once they’re in.

      Here’s some examples of the types of variations we’re testing:

      Excellent

       

      Good

      Average

      Poor

       

        Did you enjoy this blog post?

        Share this article:

        Back to EventsBack to Blog

        Facebook to remove targeting options around ‘sensitive causes’ – how will this impact non-profits?

        A laptop with the user looking at Facebook

        As you might be aware, Meta have announced that certain targeting options available on Facebook Ads around ‘sensitive causes’ have been removed as of 19 January 2022. Any activity which is currently using them can do so until March 17 2022, however any new or re-enabled campaigns post-January 19th will not be able to use this targeting.

         

        The targeting options being removed includes those referencing causes, organisations, or public figures that relate to health, race or ethnicity, political affiliation, religion, or sexual orientation. This also includes those interested in cause-related events such as: ‘World Alzheimer’s Month’ and ‘Cancer Awareness’.

         

        Meta says it is removing them because they “want to better match people’s evolving expectations of how advertisers may reach them on our platform and address feedback from civil rights experts, policymakers and other stakeholders on the importance of preventing advertisers from abusing the targeting options we make available.”

         

        To most advertisers this seems like a reasonable move. However, it is my view that this recent string of changes is incredibly damaging to non-profits who (in Meta’s own words) use Facebook and Instagram to “connect people to charitable causes they care about”. The removal of these targeting options makes it much harder to reach new users who would benefit from their support and would champion new campaigns. Off the back of social advertising being hit so heavily by the iOS 14.5 update, I know this will mean more non-profits questioning their Facebook activity going into 2022.

         

        I’m hoping that Meta considers the impact on non-profits. I’m not asking for a Google Ad Grant type scheme for Facebook (although I’m sure we’ll all agree that would be great!) but perhaps some way that Meta can allow exceptions for charities. A programme or certification scheme which means that those who qualify can use targeting like this to enable them to continue their great work.

         

        It would be great to hear your thoughts, what changes you’re now making and the impact these will have. And ultimately if you think a certification type scheme for non-profits would be a good move?

         

        Over the next month we will be working with our clients on ways to utilise the Facebook Ads platform’s other targeting options and tools to mitigate the damage. If you’re interested in discussing a potential approach for you and your organisation please don’t hesitate to reach out.

         

        Link to Meta’s announcement: https://www.facebook.com/business/news/removing-certain-ad-targeting-options-and-expanding-our-ad-controls

          Did you enjoy this blog post?

          Share this article:

          Back to EventsBack to Blog

          iOS 14.5: The Impact on Facebook Advertising

          A phone showing the Facebook logo.

          If you advertise on Facebook, you’ve probably heard about the iOS 14.5 update and the apparent havoc it’s wreaked.

          In the latest move towards championing user privacy and first-party data, Apple introduced the iOS 14.5 update to limit third-party data and tracking.

          We’ve put together the ultimate guide to the iOS 14.5 update and its impact on Facebook advertisers.

          Keep up to date with the latest industry news and trends by following us on Twitter.

           

           

          What is the iOS 14.5 update?

           

          In April 2021, Apple released a software update that requires Apps in the App Store, like Facebook, to show a prompt to users in accordance with their ‘App Tracking Transparency’ framework.

          The prompt asks users if they would like to allow third-party cookies or ask the App not to track.

          iOS 14.5 notification on an iPhone. Allow Facebook to track your activity across other companies' apps and websites.

          If users opt-out of third-party cookies, certain data collection and sharing is prohibited.

           

           

          What are third-party cookies?

           

          Cookies are text files that hold small pieces of data about a user and their interactions on a site.

          First-party cookies are ones created by the website you’re currently on, usually for their own digital purposes, like analytical reporting or saving your preferences such as a password.  Website cookie policies often refer to strictly necessary cookies, functionality cookies or performance cookies, and these are usually first-party cookies.

          Importantly, first-party cookies can’t track your behaviour across different sites they visit.

          Third-party cookies are created by other websites and these can track your activity across different sites. For advertisers, these third-party cookies are extremely useful. For instance, they allow the creation of retargeting lists of past visitors or people with similar interests. These are often referred to as targeting, tracking or advertising cookies.

          The industry is increasingly moving towards first-party-only cookies, in an attempt to prioritise user privacy.

          In January 2020, Google announced that it would scrap third-party cookies by late 2023. The technology giant followed the lead of other web browsers including Firefox and Apple’s Safari.

           

           

          How has the iOS 14.5 update impacted advertisers on Facebook?

           

          If a user asks Facebook not to track them, their data cannot be shared or collected by third parties.

          This means that there’s less data being sent to Facebook pixels, which is the code used to record conversions and optimise campaigns for specific actions.

          With less data gathered, Facebook’s algorithms will be less efficient and effective, and campaign results could suffer.

          Remarketing pools will also be smaller, lookalike audiences less reliable and reporting capabilities limited

           

           

          How much data is actually being lost?

           

          It’s difficult to say exactly; Facebook/Meta hasn’t published official figures on opt-in rates, and it will likely vary from advertiser to advertiser, depending on the region and audience demographic for example.

          To clarify, data is only ‘lost’ for users who are using the Facebook or Instagram App on an Apple mobile device with iOS 14.5 or later installed and have opted out of tracking.

          To give a ballpark of how much of your audience this equates in reality; around half the users on Facebook and Instagram use Apple mobile devices, and around 40% (and rising) of these are on iOS14+.

          Then there is the question of how many users actually opt-in to the tracking. Initial estimations showed that only 2% of these users opted into tracking. However, more recent estimations have put this figure higher, at around 15 or 25%.

          So in essence, not all user data is being lost, but potentially enough to make a noticeable and lasting impact on your results.

           

           

          What has Facebook done to ease the impact of the iOS 14.5 update?

           

          Facebook has tried to ease the impact of Apple’s iOS 14.5 update by implementing a protocol that allows for the measurement of web events in iOS 14+ devices.

          This is called ‘Aggregated Event Measurement’. However, only up to 8 conversion events can be prioritised for conversion optimisation per domain.

          To set up event configurations and use your conversion events for ad optimisation, you must verify your domain – another setup process within the Facebook Ads interface.

           

           

           

          Summary

           

          It’s clear that Apple want to be seen as the industry leaders on increased privacy and putting users, rather than platforms such as Facebook, first.

          It’s likely that this is just one update that advertisers will have to navigate in the journey towards increased user privacy and scrapping of third-party cookies.

          We can’t foresee any major moves away from advertisers using Facebook ads – as long as Facebook continues to be a widely-used social media platform, there will be the opportunity to effectively target relevant audiences.

          In the follow up blog we will delve deeper into how advertisers can respond, watch this space and subscribe to our email news to get the next article sent directly to your inbox.

          We’d love to hear your thoughts on the iOS 14.5 update and the industry trend towards prioritising first-party data. Send us a message through our contact page or email us at [email protected]. We’d love to hear from you!

           

           

            Did you enjoy this blog post?

            Share this article:

            Back to EventsBack to Blog

            Life as a Digital Marketing Intern in 2020

            Life as a Digital Marketing Intern in 2020

            Intro from John (MD)

            I remember starting my career, trying to understand this strange new world and pick up on the culture: What were my colleagues like? What behaviours were expected from me? What was the context of my work compared with that of the wider agency?

            It wasn’t easy; but looking back, there were many touchpoints to help me understand this new environment and my position within it. I was sat with a great team who gave me an example, and context. I learned a lot by watching them and listening to them at work. Also, the regular kind words and smiles helped settle me down, something I’ll always be grateful for.

            Fast forward to today and graduates of 2020 are starting their careers during a much harder time.

            In that context, it is even more inspiring to have seen how well our interns, Jasmine and Emily have made this work. They have contributed to our culture immediately, have shown a real aptitude for digital marketing and have demonstrated outstanding focus and professionalism too. Wow, we have been fortunate!

            I look forward to when they can enjoy a live company event; also to when they can experience the usual buzz of the office for the first time, – or when they are able to join us in a champagne moment after winning a new client! Hopefully, all of that won’t be too long – the champagne is already on ice.

            This blog is not just sharing what life is like as a digital Intern. It can be read as an insightful look at the views of two exceptionally talented digital marketeers, new to their careers, but who have overcome the significant hurdles of these times – and thrived.

            Enjoy!

            John

             

            Life as a Digital Marketing Intern in 2020

             

            Zoom Call

            Ever wanted to know what life is like as an intern at an award-winning digital media agency?

            We’ve caught up with our interns, Emily and Jasmine, to hear about their experiences as interns at Uprise Up.

             

            First things first, introduce yourself and give an insight into why you’re interested in digital marketing.

            Emily: I studied Chinese and International Business at the University of Leeds. Digital marketing appealed to me because of its capacity to measure all aspects of the marketing journey and understand how a user found your product/service. Also, I love a good spreadsheet!

            Jasmine: I graduated from the University of Birmingham in June 2020 with a First Class honours degree in History. I was interested in beginning a career in digital marketing throughout university, particularly after completing work experience at a social media marketing agency.

             

            What does your role entail?

            Emily: My role is Paid Media Assistant. I work with a variety of clients, setting up new campaigns, ad groups and optimising current campaigns. Typically, each day is different, but I am consistently reviewing campaigns and tweaking them to improve performance.

            Jasmine: As a digital marketing assistant, I support my team with implementation for paid search campaigns. This primarily involves continually optimising campaigns on Google Ads, through updating ad copy, keywords and monitoring performance. I also provide support for Uprise Up’s own marketing, including scheduling content for our TwitterFacebook and LinkedIn and publishing content on our website.

             

             

            Tell us a bit about the team that you work with.

            Emily: The Paid Media team works to reach audiences at the exact moment when they are looking for your product/ service. The team works closely with clients to clearly define the goal of each campaign and works to achieve that. A lot of the time our goals are oriented around increasing conversion rates.

            Jasmine: I work alongside the Strategy & Client Services team, who have all been extremely supportive with regards to sharing their expertise with me and helping me to learn new skills. We have a daily team catch up, which I value being a part of to keep up to date on work within the team.

             

            What do you enjoy the most about your role?

            Emily: I love having the ability to work on such a wide range of socially responsible clients, all with different digital marketing objectives. Having the scope of clients at an agency, like Uprise Up, allows you to learn a lot quicker about different marketing strategies.

            Jasmine: In terms of account work, I find working with charities really rewarding. Knowing that our work can lead to a charity receiving a donation or volunteer sign up is amazing! I also love supporting with marketing tasks and contributing to Uprise Up’s constant expansion and growth.

             

            What have you found to be the most challenging aspect?

            Emily: The most challenging aspect I found was getting used to navigating around the different interfaces. During the first week, it was all a bit of a shock to the system, but over time it has become a lot easier!

            Jasmine: Learning how to use completely new platforms, such as Google Ads and Google Data Studio, has definitely been challenging. I’m lucky to have such helpful and patient colleagues who are more than willing to help me out!

             

            What has it been like starting a new job from home and having limited time in the office?

            Emily: It has been a challenge, but the team have been incredible at consistent communication and checking in on my work. Going into the office for the odd few days has been great to meet the team face-to-face.

            Jasmine: Starting a role “virtually” isn’t how I imagined my first job after graduation to look like, but I’ve grown to enjoy working from home. I feel as though I’ve still had a chance to get to know the Uprise Up team even though we’re not in the office, as we have weekly catch ups and socials that often involve quizzes (which I’m unfortunately yet to win).

             

            What skills do you think are necessary to succeed as a digital marketing intern?

            Emily: I think there are 3 main skills necessary: having a curiosity and willingness to learn, being able to read and interpret data, being able to adapt quickly and react.

            Jasmine: Communication, a willingness to learn and adapt, and a keen eye for detail are all skills that are essential upon entering the world of digital marketing.

             

            Emily, what do you listen to whilst you’re working?

            Emily: I often listen to my Morning Coffee playlist first thing, whilst enjoying far too many cups of coffee! By the afternoon I tend to prefer silence or listening to the radio.

             

            Jasmine, what’s your ultimate hack for being productive whilst working from home?

            Jasmine: I find being that being surrounded by an abundance of iced coffee and my personalised ‘guilty pleasures’ playlist on Spotify playing in the background is unquestionably the ultimate working environment for high levels of productivity.

             

            If you would like to know more about our award-winning agency, tweet us at @upriseUPSEM, email us at [email protected], or simply send us a message through our contact page.

             

              Did you enjoy this blog post?

              Share this article:

              Back to EventsBack to Blog

              Big Hype, Big TV and Big Disappointment: Google Marketing Live

              Google Marketing Live

              Google Marketing Live Event : PPC’s Reactions

               

              On Tuesday, Google live-streamed their Google Marketing Live event, which highlights their developments and innovations for the next 12 months on their paid platforms. Expectations were high, and Google were ramping up their marketing about it.

              Maybe expectations where set too high, as in the end we all felt a bit underwhelmed. There wasn’t a lot of innovation or any sizeable developments delivered. In fact, what was a ‘announced’ in most cases was already known or was something which had already been in beta. If you have any questions on topics mentioned in the live event or about Google’s paid platforms in general, don’t hesitate to contact us.

              Below I’ve detailed my takeaway from the event, and I’ve caught up with Alex and Will from our Paid Media team on their thoughts!

               

              For me, I was expecting more in general. I know there’s been sizeable developments recently with the introduction of the new UI and the rebrand – but there was nothing really ground-breaking occurring here.

              I’m interested by the developments in Google Marketing Platform, especially Display and Video 360.

              As we start to get involved in more and more omni-channel campaigns, having a hub to co-ordinate between agencies, clients and even inter-agency departments sounds like a nice direction to take.

              The highlight is the introduction of cross device and remarketing reporting within Google Analytics. I’m looking forward to seeing what we can do with this level of reporting and how we can then apply this to our campaigns.

              Finally, I’m disappointed by the direction they’re taking with the new responsive ads. It feels like another unnecessary squeeze on the organic space and feels like a tick boxing exercise to force users to use a more ‘machine learning’ by Google.

              Ben, Account Director

               

              I also caught up with our Account Manager, Alex on his thoughts on the event:

              As usual these things are disappointing overall, with a lot of waffle without really explaining how these new developments actually work. We’re not in any way sure how useful anything announced will be to our clients – we’ll have to wait for more details to be able to comment further.

              There was a focus on automation (as there has been recently), but Google just say that they will be better options for advertisers without actually explaining anything in detail.

              I was disappointed there was no mention of Data Studio, as it is a product with a lot of clear potential and one that we use enthusiastically. We even received an email teasing this last week which makes it extra disappointing.

              Alex, Account Manager

               

              Finally, we spoke to Will on his thoughts:

              I think the responsive search ads do have the potential to be quite useful and are an obvious move for Google, towards providing more machine learning capabilities. They allow advertisers to provide up to 15 headlines and 4 descriptions, and then tests multiple variations of your ad for you, to work out the best combination, per search query.  They also have the ability to display up to three headlines and two 90-character descriptions, which is 90% more text overall!

              Google say that these will not only save time, but also improve ad performance, by providing more opportunities to show relevant messages to customers. We know that taking up more real-estate on a page can greatly increase CTR, so it will be interesting to see how effective they actually are.

              It does raise further questions over the future of SEO, with paid ads taking up more and more space, and organic results being pushed further down. Moreover, there are also questions over how this will affect PPC; with more organisations turning to paid ads, and less room to get in a top-of-the-page position, surely cost-per-clicks will rise too?

              Will, Digital Marketing Executive

               

              For a full rundown of the event you can still watch the live on demand here: https://blog.google/products/ads/live-stream-2018/; as well as reading their blog on the releases here: https://blog.google/technology/ads/machine-learning-hands-advertisers/

              It would be great to hear your thoughts and opinions! Tweet us @upriseUPSEM or send us an email at [email protected].

               

                Did you enjoy this blog post?

                Share this article:

                Back to EventsBack to Blog

                Programmatic Advertising – Demystifying the Matrix

                Programmatic Advertising

                Programmatic Advertising

                Programmatic advertising has been one of the biggest advancements in digital marketing in the last ten years, but ask a marketer to explain how exactly it works and you will likely be deluged in strange words you’ve never heard of. This is no surprise – programmatic advertising has the same kind of mystique as magic does. In another similarity it often seems to pull its results out of a hat, without any explanation of how the system works or how those results were achieved. This has lead to a general sense of confusion and distrust around Programmatic, simple questions like “How does it work?”, “How successful can it be?”, and What does it work for?” are all raised often. Here, I hope to answer these, and give a somewhat straight answer which can be understood without needing to be a marketing master!

                 

                If you want to get in touch about how programmatic advertising could work for your charity or business, send us an email at [email protected].

                 

                What is Programmatic?

                 

                Let’s start at the beginning and define what Programmatic is. Put simply, Programmatic is a system that automates the process of buying places to show your adverts. It excels in the areas where previously you would have had very little control over who sees your ads, such as display or television.

                 

                How does it work?

                 

                Programmatic is made up of two different systems, one for advertisers (Called a demand side platform or DSP) and one for publishers (called a supply side platform or SSP). The publisher system allows websites to put ad placements up for sale. The system will define the type of user that placement is likely to be seen by. The advertiser side allows companies to upload their creative and budgets, along with a definition of the type of user they want to see their ads.

                 

                 

                DSP & SSP

                 

                 

                This is where the automation comes into the equation. The programs play a matching game, looking for placements uploaded on the advertiser system that match the audience definitions on the advertiser system. For an advertiser, you can think of it like a shop window, where you are allowing a robot to pick out the items it thinks are the best fit for you.

                This is sometimes called ‘real-time bidding’, and this is highlighting one of the major differences between Programmatic and traditional advertising. Previously, you would have purchased impressions in bulk and in advance, purchasing a thousand impressions on one site, 10,000 on another. With Programmatic, you are purchasing placements on an impression by impression basis.

                 

                How successful can it be?

                 

                Very successful, but like any other marketing avenue it has its strengths and weaknesses. The biggest of both is how data driven the channel is. You need enough conversions and traffic for the programs to analyse, and a good enough understanding of your target audience to be able to target them effectively. If you don’t have this sort of data available, programmatic will likely do just as well as a normally managed display campaign.

                Also, unlike digital channels such as AdWords or Facebook, to target users ‘programmatically’: platforms such as Google DoubleClick require minimum buy-ins (usually $5,000/month). This is why programmatic is often the realms of agencies or large companies, small businesses and many charities will find more value in using the ‘free entry’ channels above, as opposed to spending a large portion of their budget simply to get on to the ad platform.

                 

                What does it work for?

                 

                Programmatic advertising can work for most advertising campaigns, but some will always work better than others. We’ve already mentioned the need for the correct amount of data for the system to be effective, and that a higher budget campaign is required to justify the price of entry. This means that it will always tend to work better for more expansive advertising campaigns.

                The activity is also far more inherently conversion driven than other channels, so a campaign with well defined primary and secondary conversions will always achieve better results than one where the conversion set up has been rushed. Similarly, if your campaign achieves a conversion every 3 weeks, it will take years for the system to effectively narrow down the type of user more likely to convert than others. Your campaign should be achieving at least 10 conversions a day to give the system enough data to work with.

                 

                And that’s it! Programmatic advertising may be very technical, but underneath the imposing façade it’s no different from any other channel. It has been trendy over the last few years to talk about programmatic like it is the saving grace of digital marketing, but there will always be a place for hand made advertising campaigns. Both small budget activities which can’t afford the cost to get on to a programmatic system, and bespoke, highly targeted campaigns that values quality over ease of management will both likely find that a manual approach to advertising will work best.

                If you’d like to discuss the pros and cons of programmatic more, or want to discuss how we can help you with either programmatic or manual campaigns, please do get in touch!

                  Did you enjoy this blog post?

                  Share this article:

                  Back to EventsBack to Blog

                  Automated Marketing for Charities – Why You’ll love Automation

                  What is automated marketing?

                  What is Automated Marketing?

                   

                  Automated marketing is quickly becoming one of the fastest growing digital marketing sectors, and there’s a reason why so many people are interested. But what exactly is automated marketing, and why would you or your organisation want to use it?

                  Put simply, automated marketing is the process of streamlining your inbound marketing from all channels, compiling it in one place and then engaging with your potential new supporters with minimal effort.

                  The idea is to drive visitors to your site and then guide them down an engagement or sales funnel. This takes the form of four main steps; Attract, Connect, Engage & Inspire.

                  If you want to find out more on how automated marketing could benefit your business or charity, please contact us or send us an email at [email protected]

                   

                  Inbound Methodology for Charities

                  Personas

                   

                  Before the process starts, it’s important to get a detailed idea of your ideal customer. For not-for-profits this can be quite a challenge, as depending on the organisation, you might have a wide range of different services or products with an even wider range of target audiences. Not everything you offer is going to be right for everyone, and by painting everyone with the same brush there are missed opportunities.

                  One of the first starting points in automated marketing is to create personas – your ideal target supporters. Ideally, you’ll create separate personas for each different audience, so depending on your size there might be quite a few to create! For example, if you run several challenge fundraising events you might have a persona such as Challenge Colin:

                   

                  Example Fundraiser Persona

                  By understanding each of your target supporters, such as Colin, you are better able to tailor content and their journey to suit them, ultimately making it more engaging and personal.

                   

                   

                  The Four Steps of Automation

                   

                  Attract

                   

                  The attract stage is fairly self-explanatory, your goal is to attract strangers to your website and convert them into visitors. There are many ways you can do this:

                  • Paid Search – advertising through Google or Bing
                  • Organic search – through Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) with Google or Bing
                  • Display – banner or video advertising
                  • Content – blogs and promoted offerings
                  • Social – tweets & posts

                  In the case of Colin, a video ad of your next big upcoming event on Facebook would prove to be a very interesting and attractive proposition.

                   

                  Connect

                   

                  Once a visitor is on the site, you want them to connect with your organisation, and if possible, turn them into a potential lead. This is done by asking the visitor to provide their information in return for some offering. This could be signing up to your fundraising event, email newsletter or a call for support.

                  By providing this content behind a form, there is an exchange of information, which will be fed directly into your automated marketing customer management system (CRM). Based off the users interaction, you can begin to categorise visitors into your pre-defined personas and can use this information to tailor content specifically for them.

                   

                  Engage

                   

                  This is where the majority of automation lies. You have a potential lead, but you want to be able to nurture them into becoming a supporter of your charity. The best way in which to do this is content, content, content! Providing useful content, that will actually provide the user with value, will keep them coming back for more and more. Challenge fundraising and training packs are great for this, and also provide a great opportunity to rank well organically for SEO.

                  Have lots of content is great, but how do you make sure that your supporters are seeing it, and that it’s actually the type of content they’re after? This is where emails and workflows come in!

                  Workflows are a bit like a process flowchart where you can create an entire user journey from visitor to promoter, including every single bit of content and email they will receive on the way. This is completely automated, with custom criteria and timings available to make sure that only the right person is receiving the right content at the right time. Workflows can be as simple or complex as you want to make them, but provide an amazing opportunity to really build up a relationship and rapport with potential supporters.

                   

                  Inspire

                   

                  So, after engaging with your leads they’re now supporters, but that doesn’t mean automation stops! The engagement process is ongoing, so it’s important to continue to offer supporters new content to help inspire and delight them. This might be fundraising news, new events, cause related updates or regular social media interaction. If done correctly, your supporters will begin to promote your organisation to new ‘strangers’ and the cycle begins again.

                  Although it can be a painstaking process to get everything set up and in place, once it’s there, it’s effortless. Not only are you better targeting individual audiences, you’re providing them with more relevant content, when they want it. When you have a huge number of potential contacts or subscribers, automation becomes invaluable.

                  Automated marketing provides a fantastic opportunity for charities and not-for-profits, and allows you to tailor the experience and journey of each and every one of your supporters.

                   

                    Did you enjoy this blog post?

                    Share this article:

                    Back to EventsBack to Blog

                    The Vlog Blog

                    Digital Marketing Videos

                    The one about the vlogs…

                    Exciting news here at Uprise Up – we’ve added vlogging to our long list of activities! In May we filmed the talks from our most recent event and uploaded them for your viewing pleasure (watch our playlist here).

                    This month, we’ve embarked on our own series of ‘How To’ videos where we give you our top tips on various aspects of digital marketing. This series of digital marketing videos can help you get started on your very own digital marketing strategy – all in less than 3 minutes each!

                    To make it even easier, I’ve decided to give you a run-down of the videos in our digital marketing series with links to each one. All you need to do now is sit back and enjoy!

                     

                    The Basics of Paid Search & Why Your Business Should Be Using It

                    John Onion | 1:55

                    Why do paid search? Online advertising can take up a lot of time and can be fruitless if you don’t know what you’re doing. One of our most common complaints from prospective clients is ‘we’ve tried AdWords – it doesn’t work’. This is where we come in.

                    In this video, John takes you through the basics of how to advertise online & shows you how effective paid search can be to your website – whether your business is big or small!

                     

                     

                    How To Rank Highly In Google: A Beginner’s Guide To SEO

                    Kapwom Dingis | 2:55

                    What is search engine optimisation? Kapwom is the person to ask! SEO is the process of getting seen in the search engine results process and Kapwom runs us through the 3 key areas we like to optimise. In this video, you’ll learn what’s important and what you should be doing first (Spoiler: it’s the technical SEO!). Discover why social media and bloggers are so good for your website, and why you want them all to be talking about you!

                     

                     

                    3 Local SEO Tips To Help You Rank Highly In Google

                    Ed Coles | 2:48

                    Consistent NAPs are important – and we’re not talking having a snooze! NAP is Name, Address, Phone number and they’re vitally important to your local rankings.

                    A few years ago, it was huge corporations that would appear in the results pages, the ones with more time and money to be able to dedicate to their website. Nowadays you’re more likely to find the shop from down the road – and it’s all thanks to local SEO.

                    Google now prioritise local businesses over these giant companies, but only if the local business has good local SEO.

                    Learn how to boost your local SEO with 3 quick fixes from Ed – start ranking locally today!

                     

                     

                    How To Get Free Google Advertising For Nonprofits Using Google’s AdWords Grant

                    Susan Lambiase | 3:05

                    Do you want free money with no catch? Amazingly enough, this isn’t a scam – Google really do offer from $10,000 – $40,000 PCM in advertising to charities! In this video, Susan runs through why you should sign up for Google Ad Grants (did I mention $40,000 of free advertising?) and how to sign up in only 5 steps.

                    Advertising to potential volunteers is vitally important. We have found that it’s incredibly effective – and Google let’s you do it for free!

                    4 Tips For Boosting Website Traffic Using Google Analytics

                    Ben Tuck | 2:12

                    Ben and his team are all about data! Data seems to drive the world nowadays, and it can help you give your website a massive boost in ranking – it’s all about what you do with it. Google Analytics is an essential tool for anyone who has a website so you can check website traffic and collect data. You can see your top line website statistics, or delve deeper into how each page performs. In this video, Ben runs us through the 4 top tips on how to increase website traffic using your Google Analytics data.

                     

                     

                    3 Tips To Setting Up And Effective Google Shopping Campaign

                    Ben Tuck | 1:50

                    Compete against Amazon and eBay! Google Shopping Ads show your product right at the top of the page (you may have seen Google Shopping Ads in the news recently – we also did a blog about it!). You can utilise them to showcase your products on the results page with Ben’s 3 tips on how to set up google shopping feeds – and all in less than 2 minutes!

                     

                    A Simple Guide to Digital Display Advertising

                    Susan Lambiase | 2:51

                    Have you ever been chased around the internet by one particular advert for a website you went on recently? In this video, Susan explains how this happens – and how you can do it for your website too!

                    Susan takes us through what digital display advertising is and why it can be brilliant for your brand. Digital display is brilliantly creative, and gives a really good feel for what your brand is all about. It includes YouTube, Facebook & other social media advertising and can complement your paid search advertising – or even drive your entire advertising campaign!

                     

                    So there you go, 7 videos on digital marketing strategy to help you boost your performance.

                    For help with your digital marketing campaigns, or for more information, contact us today.

                    In addition to our digital marketing videos, keep an eye out for details of our next events for more in-depth talks on various aspects of digital marketing. Check out our previous events here to see what you’re in store for!

                     

                      Did you enjoy this blog post?

                      Share this article:

                      Digital Marketing For Charities Event 2017

                      Digital Marketing Event for Charities

                      Digital Marketing For Charities Event

                       

                      Thursday 23rd of February 2017 saw over 25 charity marketing professionals brave Storm Doris to join us for Uprise Up’s Digital Marketing for Charities event. Uprise Up has worked with over 50 non-profit organisations and through hosting the evening aimed to highlight some of the key areas that can make a huge difference to a charities digital presence.

                      Thank you to all who attended our digital marketing for charities event and made the event possible, especially our speakers who were kind enough to provide us with their knowledge and insight. Links to all the presentations given throughout the evening can be found in our presentation library, and we’ve provided an overview of the speakers topics below.

                       

                      Bertie Bosrédon – Digital Strategist

                      Bertie has over 20 years digital experience and spoke about digital transformation, why digital literacy is important and the different stages of digital marketing development. Bertie provided a very entertaining talk and touched on ways to incorporate digital roles through departments, as well as how and why you should gain digital knowledge.

                       

                      Matt Haworth – Reason Digital

                      Matt, co-founder of Reason Digital and author of The Digital Fundraising Book, presented the truth about charity social media and how to get it right. With a very informative talk, he provided insights on how people can help get results for you, why you must be social and how to think of your platforms as communities of people, and not just platforms and algorithms.

                       

                       Nick Phillips – Community Impact Bucks

                      Nick has a strong background in both commercial and charity management and spoke about his own journey into the world of digital with Community Impact Bucks. He highlighted why charities should build resilience and attempt to bridge the widening ‘digital gap’ that is emerging between charities and businesses.

                       

                      John Onion – Uprise Up

                      Our very own John Onion, founder of Uprise Up, spoke about Paid Search and the importance of targeting someone at the exact moment they are searching for you. John also highlighted the importance of AdWords for charities and included some information on best practice for Google Grants and optimising your account.

                       

                      Nathan Potts – Google

                      Nathan has been helping to develop a portfolio of Google advertising agencies for nearly a year, and provided industry insights on the effectiveness of Paid Search, Display and Remarketing campaigns for non-profits. Nathan also spoke about the Google for Nonprofits scheme, Google Ad Grants and YouTube for Nonprofits, all available to eligible charities free of charge.

                       

                       

                      Thanks again for all those who helped make our digital marketing for charities event a huge success.

                      If you have any questions about topics discussed on the evening, or want to know more about our services and how we can help your charity, then please get in touch.

                      Share this article:

                      Micro Moments & Other Uprise Up Events

                      Micro Moments with Google

                       

                      Last week we hosted the first of many (hopefully!) digital marketing talks. The evening was created to start developing a community of people involved in Digital Marketing where we can share useful findings, thoughts and content.

                      Delegates from 30 companies attended across a variety of sectors. The night provided a great opportunity for learning and networking, with a more than healthy supply of food and drink to keep everyone going.

                      img_1809

                      To ensure that everyone could get the most out of the evening, there were a number of topics up for discussion; a very brief introduction to SEO, Paid Search and Analytics. We were also fortunate enough to host two fantastic guest speakers; Phil Nairn, Agency Development Manager at Google, and Anthony O’Sullivan, Managing Director at Web-Clubs. With the help of Phil and Anthony we were also treated to a look into the world of email marketing strategy and the future of internet marketing with ‘Micro Moments’.

                      Micro Moments are defined as A ‘Mobile moment that requires only a glance to identify and delivers quick information that you can either consume, or act on immediately’. People unlock and check their phones over 150x a day, and by utilising these ‘micro moments’ marketers have an immense opportunity to make an impression and create impact.

                      The talks also highlighted the importance of mobile, both in terms of the current market and where consumers will be heading in the not too distant future.

                      If you’re interested in Micro Moments and would like to know more, you can find more details and information here. We will also be detailing our thoughts and reaction to Micro Moments in a more detailed blog next week.

                      Feedback from the night was very positive and has given us a lot to draw from for future events. We hope to use these events as a platform and as an opportunity to connect with other businesses, and between us grow our collective understanding of digital marketing.

                      We have several ideas for future talks and discussions – So much so that our next event ‘Ecommerce’ is already planned for January 30th 2017. But if there are any topics you think we should discuss, please let us know!

                      For more in depth discussion about the talks and more general conversation on digital marketing, join our Uprise Up Digital Marketing Talks LinkedIn group.

                      If you are interested in attending or speaking at one of our future events, you can find more information here. Alternatively, please get in touch at [email protected].

                      We hope to see you soon!

                      Share this article:

                      Which newsletter(s) would you like?
                      Marketing Permissions

                      Uprise Up will use the information you provide on this form to be in touch with you and to provide updates and marketing. Please let us know all the ways you would like to hear from us:

                      You can change your mind at any time by clicking the unsubscribe link in the footer of any email you receive from us, or by contacting us at [email protected] We will treat your information with respect. For more information about our privacy practices please visit our website. By clicking below, you agree that we may process your information in accordance with these terms. We use Mailchimp as our marketing platform. By clicking below to subscribe, you acknowledge that your information will be transferred to Mailchimp for processing. Learn more about Mailchimp's privacy practices here.